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A Bit More Interesting 20/07/2012

Posted by zoidion in Event, Mundane.
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Well, the watched date of July 18th—when Mars opposed Uranus—passed relatively quietly, at least along the longitude line of 69 degrees West. That band of Earth was particularly on alert, you may recall, because that was where Uranus was anti-culminating at the Cancer solar ingress on June 20th. I’d thought the likelihood of various forms of fireworks would be high when Mars came along.

It’s not that nothing happened that made the news. On the 16th, a NASA satellite showed that a 120-square-kilometer (46.3-square-mile) iceberg had broken off a Greenland glacier about halfway between the Uranus line and the Saturn culminating line—Saturn being related to ice. It wasn’t the biggest chunk to break off the mainland in recent years: another one twice as big calved in 2010. But this one was/is quite significant in terms of the ongoing melting of Arctic ice: Late summer passage north of Greenland, Canada and Russia is now a regular thing.

Another small—not to the participants—but significant item was the battle, apparently on the 18th, in which indigenous Colombians expelled soldiers from a base that they say attracts attacks by FARC rebels. This occurred near the town of Toribio in Cauca province, at 76 degrees West, and close to the Sun Descendant line (along which the Sun was setting at the time of the ingress): The Sun relating to the power of the central authority. This eruption is just one of the latest eruptions in more than five hundred years of struggle between indigenous peoples and European invaders, as the latter continue encroaching on the territory and damaging the ecosystem needed to support the former.

Another incident at about 58 degrees West roughly echoes the impact of the derecho storm, which dealt a severe blow to the tattered American electric grid. In the town of Linden, Guyana, police killed several protesters in a crowd incensed about recent hikes in electric rates, after some of them had burned down the local power plant as well as the offices of the ruling party.

(The Uranus culminating line, on the other side of the Earth at 111 degrees East, was also relatively quiet, news-wise, but the environment—at least through central China—is roiling.)

Why were there not more and bigger eruptions? It was likely because neither Mars nor Uranus was at what George J. McCormack (A Text-Book of Long-Range Weather Forecasting) calls a “station”: at perigee (closest to Earth), apogee (farthest from Earth), perihelion (closest to Sun), aphelion (farthest from Sun), on the celestial equator, at the North or South tropic. (Mars crossed the equator about the time of entering Libra on July 3rd.) No, these were just a relatively ordinary Mars and Uranus, going about their usual disruptions within an era of magnified and intensified disruptions. The ride just got a little wilder, the times a bit more “interesting.”

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