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Diametrically Opposite 13/08/2012

Posted by zoidion in Weather.
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~ Twin Cities weather report: Fair, calm, 65F at 9:30 p.m. The crickets are doing their mesmerizing thing.
The loveliest stretch of weather of the summer began on the 4th, breaking the long spell of heat following the Full Moon on the 1st.
The transition was dramatic: the 3rd had been hot, sunny, somewhat breezy, with what felt like relatively low humidity; at 7:30 p.m., the first thin cloud was overhead, and by 10:00, the cloud cover, with intermittent breezes, occasionally allowed the Moon to show through; at 11:00, a moderate rain began—perhaps half an inch fell, enough to almost fill the 55-gallon rain barrel that collects water from half the garage roof (I had emptied it the day before so that I could lay a brick base for it).
On the morning of the 4th, a few sprinkles accompanied gusty winds behind the cold front, but we headed off anyway with friends, bound for an outdoor music festival. Along the way, we stopped at a county park for a quick swim—at least, Joe and I did: we had to lean into the wind before we got to the water, which we knew would be warm (recent reports had mentioned that the water temperature of some shallow lakes in southern Minnesota had reached 90 degrees F, killing many fish); the sky, however, featured some low dark clouds. An hour later, as the music began, the sun began breaking through, and by mid-afternoon, I was using an extra shirt to cover my legs against sunburn. ~

Diametrically opposite in character, Mars—signifying rising temperatures which promote evaporation (drying)—and Saturn—indicating cooling, lower air pressure and precipitation—present conditions of conflicting air currents, varying winds and unusually destructive storms over relatively small areas. Especially when in conjunction, as now (exact on August 15).

Mars, the faster-moving planet, catches up to Saturn approximately every two years, most recently at the end of July 2010.

Where on Earth—in what band of longitude—will this meeting be most notable? The astromap for the current season, derived from the solar Cancer ingress, shows Mars 29 degrees behind Saturn, so there is considerable separation in their longitudinal zones of maximum influence. (For study purposes, I’ve been noting primarily where the two were “anti-culminating”: directly under the Earth.) For Mars, that zone has been 98 degrees east, which runs through central Siberia, far western China, and Myanmar (Burma). For Saturn, as previously noted, it has been 125 east, and the Korean peninsula in particular has borne the brunt.

Does their combined effect apply to their midpoint, at about 111 east—central China, central Java?

Or does it apply to the longitudinal degree in the ingress map that corresponds to where they meet—about 128 east? That line runs through Okinawa, the heart of South Korea, eastern North Korea, the heart of Manchuria, and close to the island of Timor.

I suspect the latter, and the next few days should tell the tale.

[Note: the Moon was at maximum north declination on August 12, and crosses from north to south on August 19.]

[Again, I highly recommend George J. McCormack’s Text-Book of Long-Range Weather Forecasting, originally self-published in 100 copies in 1947, and subsequently nearly lost to the astrological community.  It is back in print, thanks to the efforts of David R. Roell, who has added a thought-provoking foreword: “Astrology Under Our Feet.” Order it from Astrology Center of America and support Mr. Roell’s excellent work.]

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