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Not Normal 16/01/2016

Posted by zoidion in Event, Long Emergency, Weather.
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Twin Cities ephemera: After an alarmingly mild December, January is being the way January is supposed to be. With day after December day in the 40s and nights above freezing, some people were reporting plants showing signs of waking up at least three months too soon: raspberry canes, for example, showing swelling leaf buds.

Around here, we missed out on the drama and destruction that hit the mid-Mississippi valley and southern plains just after the solstice. At the solstice moment, light snow began sifting down, and there’s been a white layer on the ground since.

A week ago, the season’s first blast of truly cold air came in, and now the second has arrived. Not fun to contend with, but a somewhat reassuring semblance of climatic normalcy. But not really.

Because I can’t get reports from elsewhere out of my mind.

Late December tornadoes in Texas. Rain amid the months-long darkness at the North Pole.  And now a January hurricane aiming toward Greenland.

True, it’s not the first time a hurricane has formed in January off the coast of Africa. But it’s the first time since 1938 — and “the second strongest storm to hit the Atlantic basin at any time during January since record-keeping began in 1771,” while another weird storm churned in the Pacific. 

Plus, the Atlantic storm — Alex — formed unusually far north of the equator: about latitude twenty five degrees. As “Robertscribbler” put it: “Alex appears to have done just about everything backwards.”

With the polar ice pack disintegrating year by year, it seems that the largest remaining northern area of ice — Greenland — is attracting the tropical heat. 

No, normal is gone.

Just have a look at this graph showing global average temperatures for December, going back to 1890. Notice the sharp rise at the now end of the graph. Not good.

dec-1890-2015-global-temp

So, how are these weather events reflected in the cosmic pattern? Well, the great storms and the mid-Mississippi floods were unleashed in the week following the Full Moon. The first wintry blast arrived in time with the New Moon on 9 January, and the second with the First Quarter Moon.

Lest you get the wrong idea, lunations by themselves are not reliable indicators of weather shifts. But the New Moon was conjunct the place of Mercury in the season chart — Mercury being the symbol for wind. That was the key. So a shift in the wind pattern was strongly indicated.

Plus, the New Moon and season-chart Mercury were in Capricorn, where cold Saturn is lord. And the indicators were all in the northern area of the season chart.

And now in the days — and nights: brrr — around the First Quarter, Mercury, in apparent retrograde motion since 5 January, is crossing the place of Mercury in the season chart.

CapIng2015_NM-Jan-2016.2

Various Mercury-symbolized phenomena and activities are apt to get scrambled during period when Mercury is retrograde and until Mercury exits the zodiacal zone of retrogradation. And that will last until 14 February. (Mercury began the period of retrogradation at one degree of break-the-rules Aquarius.)

So no wonder.

But there’s one more Mercury factor to note: In the season chart, Mercury is “out of bounds”: farther south than the Sun. Mercury’s domain is beyond what is normal, average, to be expected.

And where is Mercury’s weather-power zone this season? Well, this astromap shows the dashed-yellow Mercury-on-the-lower-meridian line running south-north through the western Atlantic Ocean, past the eastern tip of Canada’s province of Newfoundland and toward the western coast of Greenland.

CapIng2015_astromap-Merc.2

With a rogue winter hurricane — i.e., a heat discharger — on the loose, just one phrase comes to mind: “Turn to face the strange changes.”

Well said, Mr. Bowie.

-<zoidion>-

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Comments»

1. Mary Louise Turner - 17/01/2016

As always, loved your insights. I love how you show science and astrology together validating each other. I will “turn to face the strange changes”. What other choice is there? Wish the outlook was brighter, but it is what it is. We certainly live in strange times. I too noticed my daffodils peeking out of the soil in December. It’s too cold to see how they are doing today, but trust Mother Nature to take care of them in the meantime. Great work Zoidion! Keep me posted!

2. zoidion - 17/01/2016

December daffodils — yikes! I heard back then that the cherry trees in DC were on the verge of flowering.
Thanks for making your voice heard — it makes it easier to keep doing my own scribbling.


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